Just back from 11th century Byzantine monastery of Hosios Loukas on the slopes of Mount Helicon, Greece which is covered in exquisite mosaics.

Just back from 11th century Byzantine monastery of Hosios Loukas on the slopes of Mount Helicon, Greece which is covered in exquisite mosaics.

Greek lettering on a fallen pillar. Roman agora, Athens, Greece.

Greek lettering on a fallen pillar. Roman agora, Athens, Greece.

Soo Sunny Park (b. Seoul, Korea) - Unwoven Light at Rice University’s Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas. Composed of 37 individual sculptural units, the installation uses iridescent plexi-glass embedded in pieces of a chain link fence to cast shimmering, colorful reflections across the spacious gallery. 

(Source: Flickr / walleyfilms)

The pebble mosaics of Pella, Greece (above) where Alexander the Great was born could be a clue to the identity of the occupant of the sealed 400BC tomb found at Amphipolis:http://helenmilesmosaics.org/mosaic-sites/pebble-mosaics-of-greece/

brassmanticore:

Coin of King Joel
Aksum, modern Ethiopia6th century AD
Symbolizes Aksum’s conversion to Christianity
This coin was minted during the reign of King Joel in sixth-century Aksum. Between the second and the ninth centuries, the kingdom of Aksum prospered in Ethiopia. The trade routes along the Nile Valley that led to the Red Sea and on into the Indian Ocean made Aksum a destination for many merchants and travellers.
The large cross on the reverse of the coin symbolizes the country’s shift to Christianity. This took place during the fourth century when a traveller named Frumentius converted Aksum’s ruler, King Ezana. The old religious symbols of the sun and the moon no longer appeared on coins and were replaced with a cross, which was enlarged over the years.
The religious symbolism on these coins had strong political implications, as it aligned Aksum’s religious identity with its main trading partners, Rome and later Byzantium.
British Museum

brassmanticore:

Coin of King Joel

Aksum, modern Ethiopia
6th century AD

Symbolizes Aksum’s conversion to Christianity

This coin was minted during the reign of King Joel in sixth-century Aksum. Between the second and the ninth centuries, the kingdom of Aksum prospered in Ethiopia. The trade routes along the Nile Valley that led to the Red Sea and on into the Indian Ocean made Aksum a destination for many merchants and travellers.

The large cross on the reverse of the coin symbolizes the country’s shift to Christianity. This took place during the fourth century when a traveller named Frumentius converted Aksum’s ruler, King Ezana. The old religious symbols of the sun and the moon no longer appeared on coins and were replaced with a cross, which was enlarged over the years.

The religious symbolism on these coins had strong political implications, as it aligned Aksum’s religious identity with its main trading partners, Rome and later Byzantium.

British Museum

Latest part of the Amphipolis tomb mosaic revealed today which shows Persephone being abducted by Pluto.

Latest part of the Amphipolis tomb mosaic revealed today which shows Persephone being abducted by Pluto.

Latest work - first time making a double strand guilloche border using the wonderful video instructions provided by Lawrence Payne of Roman Mosaic Workshops: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHRGiIWzV-0

Latest work - first time making a double strand guilloche border using the wonderful video instructions provided by Lawrence Payne of Roman Mosaic Workshops: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHRGiIWzV-0

beastlysoandso:

Loving Takatoshi Sano’s latest works….

(Source: Flickr / sanoooo)

Am terribly excited about this new pebble mosaic which was uncovered at Amphipolis, Greece, yesterday at the entrance to an unopened tomb. Da, da, daaah. It dates from the 4th century BC and the theory is that the tomb belongs to someone from Alexander the Great’s retinue. It shows Hermes leading the diseased by chariot into the underworld.

Am terribly excited about this new pebble mosaic which was uncovered at Amphipolis, Greece, yesterday at the entrance to an unopened tomb. Da, da, daaah. It dates from the 4th century BC and the theory is that the tomb belongs to someone from Alexander the Great’s retinue. It shows Hermes leading the diseased by chariot into the underworld.

colin-vian:

Herman van den Broek  

colin-vian:

Herman van den Broek